iconExplore Tasmania – our island state


Russell Falls 

Tasmania is now a bucket list priority for many travellers to Australia. Famed for its world-class wilderness experiences, rugged and ancient natural beauty, thriving creative culture and fabulous food 
and drink. Don’t just take our word for it, Lonely Planet and National Geographic both agree ‘Tassie’ is a must do when Downunder.

 

Now to our TOP 10 

ARTBIKES – a free bike borrowing service that enables art lovers to easily access Hobart’s arts precincts and galleries. Spend the day immersing yourself in Hobart’s arts and culture. ARTBIKES (arts.tas.gov.au/artsatwork/artbikes) provide everything, including the bike, helmet, lock and map.

 

MONA – Museum of Old and New Art, (mona.net.au) opened in Hobart in January 2011. Housing a collection that ranges from ancient Egyptian mummies to some of the world’s most infamous and thought-provoking contemporary art. The building’s subterranean design and the owner’s unconventional and challenging curatorial approach make it a must-see for any visitor to Australia.

 

Wineglass Bay – The sunsets are golden. The weather is fine. Have a leisurely walk along the beach. Kayak around the Bay. Take a walk in the Park. See Wineglass Bay (wineglassbay.com) from the air. Come and relax in one of the world’s beauty spots.

 

Cradle Mountain – Lake St Clair National Park – Get your heart pumping and plunge through awesome, deep canyons and conquer the glaciated mountains. Cradle (parks.tas.gov.au/natparks/cradle) is a Tasmanian World Heritage-listed wilderness area, offering everything from majestic dolerite peaks and alpine lakes to rocky gorges and button grass plains. There are walks to suit all fitness levels and timetables.

 

Saturdays at Salamanca Markets (salamanca.com.au) – Enjoy the sights, sounds, flavours, action and colour of one of Australia’s best outdoor markets. Hobart’s famous market at Salamanca Place is always bursting with sights, flavours, sounds, action and colour. Here you can pick up fresh organic vegetables, handcrafted jewellery, fresh fruit, Huon pine treasures and local artwork.

 

Events – there’s always something exciting happening in Tasmania. There are flavoursome food and wine/beer events, an unexpectedly vibrant arts and culture ‘scene’ and an array of regional festivals, all brimming with colour, activity and the chance to enjoy yourself.
September – Junction Arts Festival (Launceston)
December – Falls Festival (Marion Bay)
January – MONA FOMA, Taste of Tasmania (both Hobart)
February – Festivale (Launceston)
March – Breath of Life Festival (Launceston).
(discovertasmania.com)

 

Beer & food lovers – The Cascade Brewery Company claims to be the nation’s oldest manufacturing enterprise.  Tasmania has a growing micro-brewery market including Seven Sheds, Moo Brew and Iron House. Resulting in Tasmanian Beerfest (tasmanianbeerfest.com.au), Australia’s biggest beer festival, which is held in November every year.  
In Tasmania, locals harvest oysters from rocks, catch wild trout in highland streams, have vineyards for backyards and consider organic farming to be their office job … so enjoy the regional fare, friendly encounters with growers, makers and talented chefs, and celebrate the delights that come with the changing of the seasons.

 

Meet a Tassie Devil – There are numerous places around the state to see this native icon. Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary (29 km’s north of Hobart) was established in 1981 as a sanctuary for injured and orphaned wildlife and is Tasmania’s most popular wildlife park. At Bonorong (bonorong.com.au) you will see a number of species that are sadly now extinct everywhere but Tasmania. These include the Tasmanian Devil, the Tasmanian Pademelon and the shy Tasmanian Bettong.

 

60 Great short walks – fancy a gentle stroll or a physical challenge; a seaside ramble or a mountain vista; the island offers many great walking experiences. The walks offer ancient rain forests and empty, white sandy beaches and inspiring overnight walks through Australia’s most mountainous landscapes. Go online for the FREE app.

 

Port Arthur Historic Site – Separated from Tasmania by a narrow neck of land and surrounded by shark-infested waters, Port Arthur was sold as the ‘inescapable prison’. Learn about life as a mid-19th century prisoner, stroll the landscaped Victorian gardens, and you’ll find it hard to imagine this was once a reviled prison that held 1,100 convicts.

 

For more information please visit: discovertasmania.com

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